Dyslexia Help: Spelling- Families, Advanced Phonics Rules, Matrices/Word Diagramming for Morphology, and Sound-Word Knowledge (Cook, T., 2020)

Dyslexia Help; Cook’s Independent Tutoring, Coaching, & Consulting,LLC
Helping Those with a Neurodifference Enjoy Learning Again!: “ELBERT develops connection, trust, and love by instilling curiosity, autonomy, and attunement in our students.”
— Read on simplebooklet.com/dyslexiahelp

For Dyslexia Help: Is your Child Reading Fluently BUT struggles with Spelling?

Does your child have problems with spelling (appears as Grammar Too)? Do there sentinse louk [like] This

Writing analysis of sentence above: (Does not do) deletion of letters in the end position, (their not there) struggles with sight word knowledge, (sentence not sentinse) have i/e sound confusion so a substitution in the middle position of a word, (look not louk) tries write most words out phonetically, [like] the word like is deleted for the middle position of the sentence, (this not This ) the t is capitalized for either reason, they compensate for reversals, or VPD and processes better in larger print, grammar is an abstract concept/along with formal rules).

Spelling & Dyslexia

People with Dyslexia have a sound and language processing problems. They will struggle to connect letters to sounds and, mainly problems identifying speech sounds and learning how they relate to letters and words Dsyphonetic; as well, those with visual processing problems struggle to understand visual information such as letters, shapes, or objects and, mainly problems processing graphic symbols Dsyeidetic (visual-surface) Dyslexia . Related to the absorption and processing of sounds [sounds especially can be omitted from the middle position of words the most because it’s the last sound to be processed; even though, it’s in the middle position], Therefore, students with dyslexia most commonly omit letter sounds, words, phrases in the middle position, then the end, and least commonly the beginning. When they omit, they might do sounds confusions such as repetition(s), substitution(s), addition(s) or delete altogether, on the other hand ; transversal and reversal are more common in students with a visual processing problem- have them remember: if it doesn’t look or sound right reread or rewrite till you’re brain feels like “it’s just right” [trust your brain- you are smart, you can do it, and you are love].

People with dyslexia have a sound and language processing problems and struggle to connect letters to sounds as well, those with visual processing disorder struggle to understand visual information such as letters, shapes, or objects and graphic symbols.

Sound-Word Knowledge & Word Diagramming– two major ways to help their spelling:

1) Discuss Sound-Word Knowledge (Cook, T. 2018)-how many letters, how many sounds in the word); especially if they phonetic dyslexia; if they have surface (visual) dyslexia still use Sound-Word Knowledge with phonetic and non-sense words (see Dyslexia Help for Sight Word Help).

2) Word Diagramming (Cook, T., 2020)- For Dysphonetic Dyslexia spelling help- adding their strength of strong evaluation skills of color, shape, size, and dimension to morphology plus check spelling with advanced phonics spelling and read rules. For Dsyeidetic (visual-surface) Dyslexia spelling help, have them use their strength of breaking down information by memorizing/applying spelling and reading rules.

This is what has helped me the most knowing which characteristics that I do most frequently NOTE: awareness is key. For Dysphonetic Dyslexia spelling help, they need to know what they do (deletions, substitutions,etc.) in which position (usually middle, sometimes end, rarely beginning) so they know what to look for when they “check their own spelling” (see checklist below). For Dsyeidetic (visual-surface) Dyslexia spelling help, they need to know they do more of the transposals and reversals in the middle because more of the letters look alike and same height in the middle, then end, lastly beginning of a word, phrase, or sentence (last also to be processed visually).

Also, they need sound-word knowledge from simple to complex tools and strategies (see example below with spelling the word: cap).

Do simple activities to 90% mastery then to complex; see below:

Simple

(note: never teach word family for reading because for example /am/ in not a sound to be blended BUT word families are great for reinforcement of CVC mastery and spelling patterns for spelling acquisition.)

Word Families
Word Family Ladders -am familyLevel 1
Word families are groups of words that have a common SPELLING pattern or groups of letters with the same sound. **Should only be used for spelling!! Ask me why: tcookuab@gmail.com or think about the word noun.

https://quizlet.com/join/5d7s6t7Zv

https://app.writereader.com/library/book/303fea3d-e194-4706-abfd-f3b40845f9af

*add definition, sentence, draw a picture or both, nonsense words definitions and pictures can be made-up by the child!

Discuss Sound-Word Knowledge (Cook, T. 2018)-how many letters, how many sounds in the word); especially if they phonetic dyslexia; if they have surface (visual) dyslexia still use Sound-Word Knowledge with phonetic and non-sense words (see Dyslexia Help for Sight Word Help).
cam clam dam dram exam gram ham jam lam ma’am Pam ram Sam scam slam spam swam tam tram wham yam
cam



dam


ham


exam


clam


dram


Level 1 (90% mastery)
open sounds

a=apple
o=octopus
Level 2 (90% mastery)
partially open

u= umbrella
Level 3 (90% mastery) other

e=elephant
i= igloo
(after 90% of spelling -am family) -an family(after 90% of spelling -an family) -ad family(after 90% of spelling -ad family) -at family
3 letters 3 sounds
fan
ban
can
man
pan

4 letters 3 sounds
flan
clan
bran
3 letters 3 sounds
bad
cad
dad
had
lad
mad
pad
sad

4 letters 3 sounds
brad
glad
clad
3 letters 3 sounds
rat
bat
cat
fat
hat
mat
pat
sat

4 letters 3 sounds
slat
flat
chat
spat
that
(after 90% of spelling -at family) -og family(after 90% of spelling -og family) -ot family(after 90% of spelling -ot family) -ug family
3 letters 3 sounds
log
fog
bog
cog
dog
fog
hog
jog
bog

4 letters 3 sounds
blog
clog
frog
slog
smog
3 letters 3 sounds
cot
bot
cot
dot
got
jot
lot
pot
rot
not

4 letters 3 sounds
plot
clot
blot
shot
slots
trot
3 letters 3 sounds
rug
bug
dug
hug
jug
lug
tug
mug
pug
rug

4 letters 3 sounds
plug
shrug
snug
thug

(after 90% of spelling -ug family) -un family(after 90% of spelling -un family) -en family(after 90% of spelling -en family) -in family
3 letters 3 sounds
bun
fun
gun
nun
pun
run

4 letters 3 sounds
shun
spun
stun
sun
3 letters 3 sounds
den
fen
ten
hen
men
yen
pen

4 letters 3 sounds
glen
then
open
3 letters 3 sounds
bin
din
fin
gin
kin
pin
tin
win

4 letters 3 sounds
grin
shin
skin
spin
chin
thin
twin
(after 90% of spelling -in family) -it family(after 90% of spelling -it family) -ip family5 letter words
3 letters 3 sounds
bit
fit
hit
kit
lit
mit
pit
wit
sit

4 letters 3 sounds
skit
slit
grit
snit
spit
split
twit
3 letters 3 sounds
dip
drip
flip
grip
hip
lip
sip
nip
rip
tip
zip

4 letters 3 sounds
ship
skip
blip
slip
snip
strip
trip
chip
whip
quip

brine
shine
spine
swine
twine
whine
shine
spine
swine
twine
whine
black
crack
knack
quack
snack
awake
brake
flake
quake
shake
snake
stake


Complex

For Spelling, Dyslexia and Dysgraphic students need sound-word knowledge. Sound-word knowledge is how many letters and how many sounds are in each word. Related to the absorption and processing of sounds, sounds especially can be omitted from words by the student, students with dyslexia most commonly omit letter sounds, words, phrases in the middle position, then the end, and least commonly the beginning. When they omit, they might do repetition(s), substitution(s), addition(s) or delete altogether, on the other hand; transversal and reversal are more common in students with a visual processing problem. They count the letters to check to see if they added or deleted any letters. They count the sounds to see if they repeated, substituted, or fused any sounds in the word.

Complex words are usually used in this section, but they can practice the spelling and reading words on easier words (5 or less letter words). Complex words are usually 6 or more letters, four syllable words. Have them master spelling 6 letter words then 7, 8, 9 plus at 90% mastery. Have them image the letters on fingers or in head before writing then write on paper and check their spelling with sound word knowledge- how many letters and how many sounds.

Have the student chunk this words like a phone number ex. Pop-uala-tion for the word population, and then count the each chunk, then count the total letters.

8) Advanced Phonics (Phonology-Phonemes): Triblends and other advanced sounds, Requirement at 90% mastery


ex. s triblends
ce /se/, cy /ce/, ly /le/ (review sneaky e,yng (vowel + ng) Review “l” ,”n”: Pirate Sounds
sch- school
squ- square
scr- scream
spr- spruce
str- stripe
-ace/race, place- produce, spruce, ice,

icy, lacy, spicy

holy, joly

gym, hymn, skylight, shyly 
ang= sang
ung= sung
ong=song
ing= sing
-genial, global, admiral,adrenal, elemental, pretzel, angels

table- /ul/ [le- rule too]

-broken, taken, button, rotten,  
Sound /air/ TriblendSounds /ear, are/
Triblends
Incredible I- “ti, ci, si” =/sh/Unbelievable u (tu, du, su) (including “ar, or” /ur/-end of word)
air- hair, stair

are- hare /h air/
mare /m air/
glare /gl air/
arr-arrow /air o/
err- errand /air and/
irr- irregular
ear- hear, near, stear

ere- here /h ear/
eer- steer
/st ear/
cheer /ch ear/
career /ku ear/

are (drop e)

armor /are mur/-
rule drop e-add or
relation
instution
creation
position





tu- /chu/- structure
du- /ju/= module
su- /zhu/= treasure

conductor
spendor
director
solar
ocular
popular


Common Morphology– Recognizing and Pronouncing Triblends (prefix (memorizing meaning), suffix(memorizing part of speech)) at 90% mastery

Prefix- meaningSuffix- Part of Speech
1-2 letterUn-,Re-,In-, Im-,Il-,Ir-,
An-,De-,En-,Ex-,In-
-s,-y,-es,-en,-fy,
-ty,-ly,-or,-ic
3 letterPre-,Pro-,Con-,Sub-,Syn-,
sym-,Com-, Con, Non- ,Mis-,
Bio-,Mid-,Uni– 
-ing,-ful,-ate,-ify,-ity,-ise, -ize,
-acy, -dom-ist, -ian, -eer,-est,-ion,-ive,
-ous,-ish
4 letterAnte-,Anti-, Over- ,Auto-, 
Fore-, Homo-, Semi- ,Tele- 
-ance,-ence,-ible,-able,
-tive, -tion,-sion,-cion,
-ment, -ness
5 plus letterContra-, Extra-.Trans- ,Inter-,
Super-, Hyper-, Hypo- ,Intra-,
Macro-Micro- ,Mono- ,Omni-, Post- 
-ation, -ition, -ative, -itive,
-eous, -ious
  1. Activity Sound-word Knowledge Have the student chunk into other or similar sounding words ex. know-ledge for the word knowledge, once done say the separate words and count the number in each chunk, then count the total letters.
6 letter/_sounds7 letter/_sounds8 letter/_sounds9 letter/_sounds

decline
define
shrine
nation
notion
option
potion
ration
chanty
scanty
shanty
dainty
flinty
pointy
ageing
ageism
ageist
agency
agenda
agents
bagels
damage
dosage
engage
enrage
forage
garage
homage
images
lagers
manage
meager
menage
mirage
outage
pagers
ravage
sagely
savage
sewage
silage
staged
stages
stagey
triage
usages
visage
voyage
wagers
misery
ornery
papery
watery
active
dative
motive
native
votive
oration
ovation
portion
section
suction
version
visions
abrasion
adhesion
avidity
brevity
charity
clarity
crudity
density
dignity
duality
falsity
gravity
inanity
jollity
nullity
obesity
opacity
paucity
pitying
probity
quality
reality
suavity
trinity
utility
vacuity
varsity
curious
devious
dubious
envious
furious
impious
noxious
obvious
piously
serious
tedious
various
vicious
dualism
egotism
elitism
fascism
heroism
leftism
realism
emotive
festive
furtive
motives
natives
restive
coercion
logician
magician
musician
optician
allusion
aversion
cessions
cohesion
decision
delusion
derision
division
effusion
elisions
emission
emulsion
envision
evasions
excision
illusion
incision
infusion
invasion
mansions
missions
occasion
omission
passions
pensions
revision
blustery
butchery
cemetery
chancery
colliery
creamery
crockery
delivery
drudgery
adaptive
additive
adoptive
captives
creative
curative
elective
fixative
fugitive
genitive
inactive
laxative
negative
positive
punitive
putative
reactive
relative
sedative
vocative
suspicion
clinician
dietician
logicians
magicians
deficient
efficient
prescient
scientist
conscience
deficiency
efficiency
omniscient
allusions
collusion
confusion
contusion
delusions
diffusion
effusions
exclusion
extrusion
illusions
hesitant
hydrants
ignorant
implants
infantry
inhalant
instants
irritant
jubilant
lanterns
litigant
mantises
mantling
meantime
merchant
imperative
incentives
indicative
infinitive
initiative
innovative
locomotive
meditative
motiveless
narratives
negatively
nominative
objectives

2. Activity- Word Diagramming (Cook, T., 2020)- adding their strength of strong evaluation skills of color, shape, size, and dimension to morphology plus check spelling with advanced phonics spelling and read rules.

Step 1 draw on board to Diagram word (see key below) from matrices on whiteboard.chat-

Step 2 discuss Sound-word knowledge= how many letters, how many morphemes do you hear ex reassignment= 12 letters, 4 morphemes.

Scope & Sequence

I have a checklist of spelling markers and traits that describes what dyslexic spelling looks like (see above). It’s plain and simple: The middle sounds even though in the middle position is the last to be processed. The last sound even though is the last position is the second to be processed. Since language sound processing is needed for spelling, you will observe them misspelling in mainly in middle position, then last position by doing omissions (leading to deletions, additions, substitutions, repetitions)!!!!. The students will asses themselves which markers and traits they may do when spelling; this will have them become aware of what they do and in which position of a word. They will be presented Reading & Spelling Rules which, in turn, will help eradicate some spelling errors.

I talk about the checklist of markers and traits on a whiteboard. I answer and ask the students questions to think about with their own spelling. I present the reading & spelling rules on Quizlet- parents can request access to both of these resources!! I am very open and know awareness is key along with every student having different needs!!!

Scope & Sequence

Session 1-
Dyslexia Spelling and Reading Markers & Traits (checklist) in those with Dyslexia, always look at the vowels, if a word doesn’t look right, or sound right (especially middle of word), try the vowel:

“Try it…”
short
long
schwa= /u/

Introduce: Prefix, Root & Suffix Word Diagramming (see photo below)

Session 2-
Common Spelling Rules-Start with the “Big Six” : FLOSS, 1-1-1 doubling rule (later 2-1-1); e dropping rule, y rule, tch rule, and the dge rule

Review and practice Prefix, Root & Suffix Word Diagramming (see photo below)

Session 3-
Spelling Clues & Reading Rules– Unbelievable u=always you can find any vowel (especially a connector like “as” says /us/) In any part of a word can say /u/ except with q is always followed by u which is silent; You will always find that…The letter “s'” never follow “s” except “x, ch, sh only es also z and s.”

Review and practice Prefix, Root & Suffix Word Diagramming (see photo below)

Session 4-
Spelling Clues & Reading Rules Always, when you hear an /oi/ at the end of a word spell it oy, when you hear an /oi/ in the middle spell it “oi”; When you hear /k/ at the beginning of a word, it’s mostly a “c”, sometimes a “k”; When you hear /k/ at the end of a word, it’s mostly a “ck”, sometimes a “k”, and rarely a “c” then add prefix/suffix.

Review and Practice Prefix, Root & Suffix Word Diagramming (see photo below)

Simple

Complex find more words here USE 2020 SAT WORDS https://blog.prepscholar.com/sat-vocabulary-words

Join Here on whiteboard.chat: https://www.whiteboard.chat/join/f061d754-3ca4-4011-9adc-efdd5adfb805-pgNum-1 or see below:

Other Spelling Clues & Reading Rules

Step 1 Have them read passage, if they mispronounce word(s) “look up” definition and “fix up” with applying the spelling clues and rules below:

Passage- ReadWorks: https://www.readworks.org/; Blinkist: https://www.blinkist.com

PassageWordsDefinitionSpelling Clues/Reading Rules


RW: https://www.readworks.org/article/Astronomy/ab4d4952-0f94-4d22-b2d5-15d520c2da35#!articleTab:content/contentSection:eeff0e15-58d8-45b1-8161-93ef6ab4ad49/

excitementa.The act or an instance of exciting.
b. The condition of being excited.
Again, the “c” alone is not always able to sound like a hard “c.” but in “ch” and rarely it is “s”

Step 2 Then, check spelling with apply these always, sometimes, rarely spelling and reading rules to these patterns (below): http://www.neilramsden.co.uk/spelling/searcher/index.html; https://www.spellingcity.com/grade-level-lists.html

Review


Session 1

Session 2
Session 3Session 4Session 5
Spelling and Reading Markers & Traits (checklist) in those with Dyslexia, always look at the vowels, if a word doesn’t look right, or sound right (especially middle of word), try the vowel:
“Try it…”
short
long
schwa= /u/
FLOSS Rule /f,l,s/ 1-1-1 doubling rule (later 2-1-1)e dropping rule, y ruletch rule, and the dge rule

Other Reading Clues and Spelling Rules

AlwaysSometimesRarely
(Review) Having problems with a word (doesn’t look right or sound right)…always look at the vowels, if a word doesn’t look right, or sound right, try the vowel:

“Try it…”
short
long
schwa= /u/
i and y term-
sometimes say “igh” (usually at the end or middle of a word)

examples:
slyly
myself
but may say i

examples:
my
type

The letter y, not i, is used at the end of an English word

examples:
(my)
sly
cry
Rarely, adding a prefix to a word does not usually change the spelling.

examples:
bi + cycle= bicycle
re + act= react
Unbelievable u- always you can find any vowel In any part of a word can say /u/ except with
q is always followed by u which is silent

examples:
about
Images
happen

examples:
queen- /k/ not /kw/
question
quake
Sometimes, words in o after a consonant may spell their plural with an s or es

examples:
toes
tomatoes
heros
potatoes
mostly, “f” as in “font,”
sometimes “ph” saying “f” as in “geography”

rarely, “gh” is saying “f” as in “enough”
You will always find that…The letter “s'” never follow “s” except “x, ch, sh only es also z and s.” (review Ce)

examples:
excite
boxes
foxes

beaches
reaches
teaches

dashes
rashes
sashes
ti, xi, si, ci, are sometimes different sounds such as:

ti, si, ci may say “sh” when the syllable before it ends in
examples:
station
session
lesion
Tricia

si may say /zh/
examples:
invision
Again rarely, and as in “ache” the silent “h” after the “c” is needed in approximately 20 words

because without the “h” after the “c,” the “c” would become soft.

example:
“ache” would be “ace” without the silent “h,” and “chemistry” would be “cemistry.”
Review dge is only used after a single vowel that says it’s short sound

example:
edge
dge may be used only after a single vowel that says
a,e,i,o, or u

examples:
badge
edge
budge
bridge
lodge


Add that there are three words contain a silent d

examples:
cartridge-8 letters
knowledge- 9 letters
acknowledge- 11 letters
when adding an ending to a word that ends with a consonant and y, sometimes use i instead of y unless the ending is ing.

examples:
baby
babies
try
tried
trying

Sometimes, if a consonant precedes y, then y changes to i
before a suffix, unless the suffix begins with an i (keep the y to preserve the i or e sound).

never drop the y- keep or change it to i. with a vowel + y (ay, ey, oy, uy), always keep the y. Likewise, always with a consonant + y change the y to i.




Rarely, does a word end in a it can say /ä/ ex sō-də.

example:
Soda
Tricia
Ava


A may also say /ä/
after a w or before an l

example:
wall
call
ball
words beginning with the sound /z/ are always spelled with z never s

example:
zoo
zipper
zing
zam
zebra

sometimes words with s at end can be spelled with s but says /z/ (especially at the end of word before an e, y)

busy- 4 letters
rosy- 4 letters
epilepsy-7 letters


Not these:
jealousy- 8 letters
prophesy- 8 letters
sometimes “ed” has one of these three sounds
/ed/- shredded
/d/- spied, lived
/t/- poked, jumped
Again, the “c” alone is not always able to sound like a hard /k/ “but in “ch” and rarely it is “s”

example:
cycle
cylinder
cyst
Always you will find, chameleon prefixes are hard to spell because the only hear one consonant.

examples:
(ad= to, toward)

ad + pear= appear instead of adpear \ ə-ˈpir \

ad + tract= attract instead of adtract /
\ ə-ˈtrakt \
“ck” sometimes can be used only after a single vowel that says it’s short sound

example:
back
neck
lick
rock
duck
When you hear /k/ at the beginning of a word, it’s mostly a “c”, sometimes a “k”.

examples:
cat
care
coast

When you hear /k/ at the end of a word, it’s mostly a “ck”, sometimes a “k”, and rarely a “c”.

back
bake
pic
Always-Till and full, written alone have two l’s,
but when used as a suffix, only one l is written

examples:
until
beautiful
conceptual
Sometimes drop the final e in a word before adding a suffix beginning with a vowel (a, e, i, o, u) but not before a suffix beginning with a consonant.

Examples:
ride + ing = riding
guide + ance = guidance
like + ness = likeness
arrange + ment = arrangement
We often use ay
to say a at the end of a base word,
never a alone:

examples:
say
way
slay
play
Sometimes change a final y to i before a suffix, unless the suffix begins with i.

example:
party + es = parties
try + es = tries
ruby +es= rubies
spy + es= spies
try + ing = trying
copy + ing = copying
Always, when you hear an /oi/ at the end of a word spell it “oy”, when you hear an /oi/ in the middle spell it “oi”.Mostly, nouns end in a vowel then a y for those just add an s

example:
joys
rays
plays
sprays
monkeys
“s” sometimes says /z/ especially before an e or y, but always written as “s” at the end of a word ex. busy, easy, clumsyTo make a long vowel sound, sometimes you need to add a second vowel.

examples:
boat
cheap
paid
The letter “q” is almost always followed by the letter “u” and it sometimes sounds like /kw/.

examples:
quack
quart
quarter
queen
question
quick
quilt
quiz.

Sometimes “qu” sounds like a /k/

example:
conquer
conquest
i and o may sometimes say /I/ and /O/ if followed by 2 consonants

example:
find
blind
grind

example:
old
told
cold
When a vowel sounds like its name in a word, sometimes it is called a long vowel sound

example:
go
no
logo
Sometimes, use i before e, except after c, or when sounding like “a” as in “neighbor” and “weigh.”

examples:
piece
chief
perceive
ceiling

Sometimes there’s exceptions

example:
neighbor
weird
height
neither
weigh

AGAIN: After c we use ei (receive). If we say a, we use ei (vein). In the list of exceptions, we use ei. In all other words sometimes, the phonogram ie is used.
Sometimes, you may double a final single consonant before adding a suffix when the word ends with a single vowel followed by a single consonant.

examples:
stop + ing =stopping
occur + ence = occurrence
swim + ing = swimming
sometimes nouns ending in f form plurals by adding an s

example:
roofs
cliffs
muffs
reefs
Sometimes nouns ending in f or fe form plurals by adding a ve

example:
elves
wives
halves
wolves
lives


“gh, g, h, p, k, w, and don’t forget sneaky e, a, o” that are sometimes silent in words (ghost letters, like the h here in ghost)

examples
night
sign
ghost
psalm
know
write

game
roared
through

Matrices for Morphology

Tricia Cook: Independent Tutor & Consultant in Birmingham AreaAugust 1, 2018Tricia Cook: Independent Tutor & Consultant in Birmingham Area’s albums

https://membean.com/treelist?fbclid=IwAR1blfri4bMiJsD32yKBG79ILO3Hyoxm4A620m-nCmR_c_SuCZtZvVBfsdA

https://www.whiteboard.chat/board/f061d754-3ca4-4011-9adc-efdd5adfb805-pgNum-1

http://www.neilramsden.co.uk/spelling/matrix/?fbclid=IwAR0va1pXbTddgOwD_6pUrkWeF11Z02E8Ts8l4vptEBE-qWXitjLjSUKJckw

Other Resources:

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/15jFgZrHoPAVD1u7mzJHtBkmCNC9FPhTl1FofEn6C8hY/edit?usp=sharing

http://www.neilramsden.co.uk/spelling/searcher/index.html

https://play.google.com/books/reader?printsec=frontcover&output=reader&id=rVn7JwAAAEAJ&pg=GBS.PA0

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary

To Learn More Go To: www.myelbert.com

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©ELBERT™: EVERYONE LEARNS BETTER EMBRACING REVOLUTIONARY TEACHING 2020

Published by Tricia Cook, MEd., Online Dyslexia and Behavioral Interventionist, RSP, AA O-G Tutor & Montessorian

My interest is in helping parents and teachers to understand learning and behavioral challenges and to love learning again. I graduated from Auburn in ECE in 1998. I have been a Montessori teacher here in Birmingham for almost 12 years and have lived in Birmingham for the past 19 years. As an early childhood teacher, I want continue to grow and develop as a constant learner. In 2012, I graduated from Secondary Education with a P-12 Reading Specialist certification the University of Alabama. As a Reading Specialist, I train on diversity and literacy development; I have a specialized knowledge of assessment and diagnosis that is vital for developing, implementing, and evaluating your literacy and neurodiversity behavioral, character development programing. Also, I have varying experiences designing instruction and environments for Montessori and Non-Montessori (OSR-Pre-K) environments. Therefore, I can consult for any environment or setting! In 2013, I attained my highly qualified status in ECE and Reading. In 2013, I also got my Orton-Gillingham AA tutor certification. I currently tutor full-time along with consulting. I have actually been tutoring since 2003. Along with other independent tutoring/interventionist experiences, I have brought dozens of students from an emergent to an advanced reading level! In addition to tutoring, I have provided the reading strengths and needs of my students and share that information to classroom teachers, parents, specialized teachers, and other stakeholders.  Lastly, I have also been a trainer/presenter, since 2008 and really enjoy this aspect of my career. As an experienced trainer, I have trained on many topics including: literacy (the five components), classroom management, positive discipline, diversity character development, Montessori Philosophy, policies and procedures, child development, and Alabama's Pre-k. Take note: Schools and families are desperately looking for an alternative type of affordable multi-sensory, hands-on, and interesting instruction. Currently, I am training and interested in writing on the following topics: A Comparison of Pre-K to Kindergarten; Adolescent Literacy (7th+); Assessment; Developing Readers; Children’s Literature; Classroom Management Techniques; Comprehension; Montessori Philosophy; Environmental Print & Early Writing; Family Attachment; Language and Literacy; Outdoor Classroom; Poetry Writing (7th+); Positive Guidance; Fine-motor Development; Cursive Writing; Creative Writing; Comprehension: Study Skills/Test Taking Strategies; Morphology; Phonics Instruction; Diversity Education; Neurodiversity Education; HandWriting; Reading Strategies; Best Practices P-12. Thank you, Tricia Cook, MEd., RSP, AOG; https://linktr.ee/tcooktutor

8 thoughts on “Dyslexia Help: Spelling- Families, Advanced Phonics Rules, Matrices/Word Diagramming for Morphology, and Sound-Word Knowledge (Cook, T., 2020)

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