Dyslexia Help: Spelling- Families, Rules, Matrices for Morphology, and Much More (Cook, T., 2020)

Dyslexia Help by Cook’s Independent Tutoring, Coaching, & Consulting,LLC
Helping Those with a Neurodifference Enjoy Learning Again!: “ELBERT develops connection, trust, and love by instilling curiosity, autonomy, and attunement in our students.”
— Read on simplebooklet.com/dyslexiahelp

For Dyslexia Help: Is your Child Reading Fluently BUT struggles with Spelling?

Does your child have problems with spelling (appears as Grammar Too)? Do there sentinse louk [like] This

Writing analysis of sentence above: (Does not do) deletion of letters in the end position, (their not there) struggles with sight word knowledge, (sentence not sentinse) have i/e sound confusion so a substitution in the middle position of a word, (look not louk) tries write most words out phonetically, [like] the word like is deleted for the middle position of the sentence, (this not This ) the t is capitalized for either reason, they compensate for reversals, or VPD and processes better in larger print, grammar is an abstract concept/along with formal rules).

People with dyslexia have a sound and language processing problems and struggle to connect letters to sounds as well, those with visual processing disorder struggle to understand visual information such as letters, shapes, or objects and graphic symbols. https://lnkd.in/dG9yekQ 

This is what has helped me the most knowing which characteristics that I do most frequently NOTE: awareness is key. They need to know what they do (deletions, substitutions,etc.) in which position (usually middle, sometimes end, rarely beginning) so they know what to look for when they “check their own spelling” (see checklist below). Also, they need sound-word knowledge from simple to complex tools and strategies (see example below with spelling the word: cap).

Simple

Word Families
Word Family Ladders -am family
Word families are groups of words that have a common SPELLING pattern or groups of letters with the same sound. **Should only be used for spelling!! Ask me why: tcookuab@gmail.com or think about the word noun. For example, the “ain” word family includes brain, chain, gain, pain, rain, and so on. The following list of common word families come from Wylie and Durrell, 1970.

https://quizlet.com/join/5d7s6t7Zv

https://app.writereader.com/library/book/303fea3d-e194-4706-abfd-f3b40845f9af

*add definition, sentence, draw a picture or both, nonsense words definitions and pictures can be made-up by the child!
cam clam dam dram exam gram ham jam lam ma’am Pam ram Sam scam slam spam swam tam tram wham yam
cam



dam


exam


ham


clam


dram


Complex

Spelling Clues & Reading Rules: Have them read passage, if they mispronounce word(s) “look up” definition and “fix up” with applying the spelling clues and rules below:

Passage- ReadWorks: https://www.readworks.org/; Blinkist: https://www.blinkist.com

PassageWordsDefinitionSpelling Clues/Reading Rules


RW: https://www.readworks.org/article/Astronomy/ab4d4952-0f94-4d22-b2d5-15d520c2da35#!articleTab:content/contentSection:eeff0e15-58d8-45b1-8161-93ef6ab4ad49/

excitementa.The act or an instance of exciting.
b. The condition of being excited.
Again, the “c” alone is not always able to sound like a hard “c.” but in “ch” and rarely it is “s”

Apply these always, sometimes, rarely spelling and reading rules to these patterns: http://www.neilramsden.co.uk/spelling/searcher/index.html

AlwaysSometimesRarely
Having problems with a word (doesn’t look right or sound right)…always look at the vowels, if a word doesn’t look right, or sound right, try the vowel:

short
long
schwa= /u/
i and y term-
sometimes say “igh”

examples:
big
gym
but may say i

examples:
silent
my
type

The letter y, not i, is used at the end of an English word

examples:
(my)
pike
sly
Rarely, adding a prefix to a word does not usually change the spelling.

examples:
bi + cycle= bicycle
re + act= react
q is always followed by u
queen

que- /k/ not /kw/
Sometimes, words in o after a consonant may spell their plural with an s or es

examples:
toes
tomatoes
heros
potatoes
mostly, “f” as in “font,”
sometimes “ph” saying “f” as in “geography”

rarely, “gh” is saying “f” as in “enough”
You will always find that letters never follows x
box
sox
fox
ti, xi, si, ci, are sometimes different sounds such as:

ti, si, ci may say “sh” when the syllable before it ends in
examples:
station
session
lesion
Tricia

si may say /zh/
examples:
invision
Again rarely, and as in “ache” the silent “h” after the “c” is needed in approximately 20 words

because without the “h” after the “c,” the “c” would become soft.

example:
“ache” would be “ace” without the silent “h,” and “chemistry” would be “cemistry.”
dge is only used after a single vowel that says it’s short sound
edge
dge may be used only after a single vowel that says
a,e,i,o, or u

examples:
badge
edge
budge
bridge
lodge


There are three words contain a silent d

examples:
cartridge-8 letters
knowledge- 9 letters
acknowledge- 11 letters
when adding an ending to a word that ends with a consonant and y, sometimes use i instead of y unless the ending is ing.

examples:
baby
babies
try
tried
trying

Sometimes, if a consonant precedes y, then y changes to i
before a suffix, unless the suffix begins with an i (keep the y to preserve the i or e sound).

never drop the y- keep or change it to i. with a vowel + y (ay, ey, oy, uy), always keep the y. Likewise, always with a consonant + y change the y to i.




Rarely, does a word end in a it can say /ä/ ex sō-də.

example:
Soda
Tricia
Ava


A may also say /ä/
after a w or before an l

example:
wall
call
ball
words beginning with the sound /z/ are always spelled with z never s

example:
zoo
zipper
zing
zam
zebra

sometimes words with s at end can be spelled with s but says z

busy
epilepsy-7 letters
jealousy- 8 letters
prophesy- 8 letters
sometimes “ed” has one of these three sounds
/ed/- shredded
/d/- spied, lived
/t/- poked, jumped
Again, the “c” alone is not always able to sound like a hard “c.” but in “ch” and rarely it is “s”

example:
cycle
cylinder
cyst
Always you will find, chameleon prefixes are hard to spell because the only hear one consonant.

example:
(ad= to, toward)
ad + pear= appear instead of adpear \ ə-ˈpir \
ad + tract= attract instead of adtract /
\ ə-ˈtrakt \
ck sometimes can be used only after a single vowel that says it’s short sound

example:
back
neck
lick
rock
duck
Always-Till and full, written alone, have two l’s,
but when used as a suffix, only one l is written
until
beautiful
Sometimes drop the final e in a word before adding a suffix beginning with a vowel (a, e, i, o, u) but not before a suffix beginning with a consonant.

Examples:
ride + ing = riding
guide + ance = guidance
like + ness = likeness
arrange + ment = arrangement
We often use ay
to say a at the end of a base word,
never a alone:

examples:
say
way
slay
play
Sometimes change a final y to i before a suffix, unless the suffix begins with i.

example:
party + es = parties
try + es = tries
ruby +es= rubies
spy + es= spies
try + ing = trying
copy + ing = copying
Always, when you hear an /oi/ at the end of a word spell it oy, when you hear an /oi/ in the middle spell it oi.Mostly, nouns end in a vowel then a y for those just add an s

example:
joys
rays
plays
sprays
monkeys
To make a long vowel sound, sometimes you need to add a second vowel.

examples:
boat
cheap
paid
The letter “q” is almost always followed by the letter “u” and it sometimes sounds like /kw/.

examples:
quack
quart
quarter
queen
question
quick
quilt
quiz.

Sometimes “qu” sounds like a /k/

example:
conquer
conquest
i and o may sometimes say /I/ and /O/ if followed by 2 consonants

example:
find
blind
grind

example:
old
told
cold
When a vowel sounds like its name in a word, sometimes it is called a long vowel sound

example:
go
no
logo
Sometimes, use i before e, except after c, or when sounding like “a” as in “neighbor” and “weigh.”

examples:
piece
chief
perceive
ceiling

Sometimes there’s exceptions

example:
neighbor
weird
height
neither
weigh

AGAIN: After c we use ei (receive). If we say a, we use ei (vein). In the list of exceptions, we use ei. In all other words sometimes, the phonogram ie is used.
Sometimes, you may double a final single consonant before adding a suffix when the word ends with a single vowel followed by a single consonant.

examples:
stop + ing =stopping
occur + ence = occurrence
swim + ing = swimming
sometimes nouns ending in f form plurals by adding an s

example:
roofs
cliffs
muffs
reefs
Sometimes nouns ending in f or fe form plurals by adding a ve

example:
elves
wives
halves
wolves
lives

Matrices for Morphology

Tricia Cook: Independent Tutor & Consultant in Birmingham AreaAugust 1, 2018Tricia Cook: Independent Tutor & Consultant in Birmingham Area’s albums

https://membean.com/treelist?fbclid=IwAR1blfri4bMiJsD32yKBG79ILO3Hyoxm4A620m-nCmR_c_SuCZtZvVBfsdA

https://www.whiteboard.chat/board/f061d754-3ca4-4011-9adc-efdd5adfb805-pgNum-1

http://www.neilramsden.co.uk/spelling/matrix/?fbclid=IwAR0va1pXbTddgOwD_6pUrkWeF11Z02E8Ts8l4vptEBE-qWXitjLjSUKJckw

Other Resources:

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/15jFgZrHoPAVD1u7mzJHtBkmCNC9FPhTl1FofEn6C8hY/edit?usp=sharing

http://www.neilramsden.co.uk/spelling/searcher/index.html

https://play.google.com/books/reader?printsec=frontcover&output=reader&id=rVn7JwAAAEAJ&pg=GBS.PA0

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary

To Learn More Go To: www.myelbert.com

dyslexia #dyslexiaawareness #adhd #autism #dyslexic #dyslexiaeducation #education #dysgraphia #specialeducation #learningdisabilities #dyslexiaadvocate #dyslexiasupport #learningdifficulties #saydyslexia #specialneeds #dyscalculia #dyspraxia #neurodiversity #learningdisability #learning #autismawareness #dyslexiaisreal #add #downsyndrome #parenting #asd #reading #dyslexiapower #mentalhealth #bhfyp #ortongillingham #dyslexiamom #madebydyslexia #school #dyslexiatherapy #teachersofinstagram #dyslexiaismysuperpower #dyslexiateacher #in #anxiety #speechtherapy #homeschool #dyslexicthinking #occupationaltherapy #dyslexicandproud #adhdawareness #dyslexiaassociation #dyslexiaisagift #disability #dyslexickids #dislexia #homeschooling #art #dyslexiaawarenessmonth #teacher #children #parents #love #dyslexie #awareness

© ELBERT™: EVERYONE LEARNS BETTER EMBRACING REVOLUTIONARY TEACHING 2020

Published by Tricia Cook, MEd., Online Dyslexia and Behavioral Interventionist, RSP, AA O-G Tutor & Montessorian

My interest is in helping parents and teachers to understand learning and behavioral challenges and to love learning again. I graduated from Auburn in ECE in 1998. I have been a Montessori teacher here in Birmingham for almost 12 years and have lived in Birmingham for the past 19 years. As an early childhood teacher, I want continue to grow and develop as a constant learner. In 2012, I graduated from Secondary Education with a P-12 Reading Specialist certification the University of Alabama. As a Reading Specialist, I train on diversity and literacy development; I have a specialized knowledge of assessment and diagnosis that is vital for developing, implementing, and evaluating your literacy and neurodiversity behavioral, character development programing. Also, I have varying experiences designing instruction and environments for Montessori and Non-Montessori (OSR-Pre-K) environments. Therefore, I can consult for any environment or setting! In 2013, I attained my highly qualified status in ECE and Reading. In 2013, I also got my Orton-Gillingham AA tutor certification. I currently tutor full-time along with consulting. I have actually been tutoring since 2003. Along with other independent tutoring/interventionist experiences, I have brought dozens of students from an emergent to an advanced reading level! In addition to tutoring, I have provided the reading strengths and needs of my students and share that information to classroom teachers, parents, specialized teachers, and other stakeholders.  Lastly, I have also been a trainer/presenter, since 2008 and really enjoy this aspect of my career. As an experienced trainer, I have trained on many topics including: literacy (the five components), classroom management, positive discipline, diversity character development, Montessori Philosophy, policies and procedures, child development, and Alabama's Pre-k. Take note: Schools and families are desperately looking for an alternative type of affordable multi-sensory, hands-on, and interesting instruction. Currently, I am training and interested in writing on the following topics: A Comparison of Pre-K to Kindergarten; Adolescent Literacy (7th+); Assessment; Developing Readers; Children’s Literature; Classroom Management Techniques; Comprehension; Montessori Philosophy; Environmental Print & Early Writing; Family Attachment; Language and Literacy; Outdoor Classroom; Poetry Writing (7th+); Positive Guidance; Fine-motor Development; Cursive Writing; Creative Writing; Comprehension: Study Skills/Test Taking Strategies; Morphology; Phonics Instruction; Diversity Education; Neurodiversity Education; HandWriting; Reading Strategies; Best Practices P-12. Thank you, Tricia Cook, MEd., RSP, AOG; https://linktr.ee/tcooktutor

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